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To a fighter pilot familiar with the incredible noise, vibration and torque of a high performance piston- engined fighter, the unique sensation of smooth power from the thrust of jet engines was nothing short of miraculous, and following the young General Adolf Galland's debut flight in the Messerschmitt Me262, he said he 'felt as though the angels were pushing'.

A new era in aviation was dawning as he literally whistled through the air in the epoch-making jet fighter. With a top speed of around 540 m.p.h. it was a good 100 m.p.h. faster than anything else in the air.

The beautifully proportioned airframe of the Me262, with its sleek fuselage and swept wings, gave it the aerodynamics for high speed flight, and when the unique jet appeared in the skies over the Reich, it caused the Allied pilots to rethink their combat tactics.

Robert Taylor's action-packed limited edition - the FIRST in his Protagonists Series - takes us right into the path of Adolf Galland and a group of his JV-44 Wing Me262s as they make a high-speed rocket assault on a formation of B-26 Marauders. Diving from a 6000 ft. height advantage to 1500 ft. below and behind the bomber formation, the 262s made a fast approach, climbing to the level of the bombers before loosing off their 24 R4M rockets in one salvo at 600 yards; a long burst of cannon fire followed at 150 yards, and a quick climbing exit from the scene.

Galland's Me262 is captured by the artist at the moment of release of his rocket salvo, the burst of flame and smoke visible under each wing as the deadly missiles are launched. Above, a second 262 pilot launches his rockets while a third lines up his sights on the B-26s ahead. Below two more swoop into the attack, one closing on two straggling Marauders on the left of the picture.

The scene is set at 20,000 feet over Southern Germany on an afternoon in April 1945.

Size 36" x 26". Limited edition of 1250 prints.
Each print is individually signed by three outstanding Luftwaffe Aces: Adolf Galland, Erich Rudorffer and Walter Schuck.